Croagh Patrick

Views of Croagh Patrick (Westport, Co. Mayo) from Newport, Co. Mayo.  Saint Patrick fasted on the summit of Croagh Patrick for forty days in the fifth century and built a church there…

© Aisling Jennings Photography

Through the rushes

Different shots taken through the tall green rushes growing on the wild hilltops in Newport, Co. Mayo on a sunny evening in June with Croagh Patrick visible in the distance

© Aisling Jennings Photography

Flower boat

Flowers growing in a blue boat in Newport, Co. Mayo, Ireland on the banks of the water

© Aisling Jennings Photography

Burrishoole Friary

Burrishoole Abbey, a 15th Century Dominican friary, is located on a tidal inlet (lagoon) on the north side of Clew Bay, Co Mayo.  Burrishoole Friary was a Dominican friary in County Mayo, Ireland. Its ruin is a National Monument.

Burrishoole Friary was founded in 1470 by Richard de Burgo of Turlough, Lord MacWilliam Oughter. It was built without the permission of the Pope. In 1486, the Pope instructed the Archbishop of Tuam to forgive the Friars. Richard de Burgo resigned his lordship in 1469 and entered the friary he had founded where he remained a friar until his death four years later. This was not an uncommon occurrence and serves to illustrate the connection between patrons and their foundations at this time.

The church and the eastern wall of the cloister remain. The grounds of the Friary are an actively used cemetery.   Burrishoole Friary is a few kilometers west of the town of Newport, County Mayo, Ireland.  It is often called Burrishoole Abbey, however, this colloquial name is inaccurate as the Dominican order did not have abbots, therefore Dominican houses are not technically abbeys.   Almost all the friaries and abbeys across Ireland were suppressed in the wake of the Reformation in the 16th century.  Very few were rebuilt after that time and now only the ruins survive, pleasing, if poignant, late Gothic relics of what must have been among the most striking buildings in the countryside of pre-Tudor Ireland.

Abandoned Boat

Abandoned boat between Newport and Mulranny, near Tiernaur in Co. Mayo Ireland – in black and white and colour photographs.

shipwrecked – black & white

Ship wrecked boat between Newport and Mulranny, near Tiernaur in Co. Mayo Ireland.

Click here to view some photographs of this boat in colour.

shipwrecked

Came across this ship wrecked boat between Newport and Mulranny, near Tiernaur in Co. Mayo Ireland.

Click here to view some photographs of this boat in colour.

St Patrick’s Church Newport Co Mayo

St Patrick’s Church Newport Co Mayo

Newport has a very striking railway bridge (no longer used for rail carriage) like an aqueduct which is commonly referred to as “The Viaduct”, which, with the Roman Catholic church on top of the hill, dominate the town and create a picturesque appearance.

St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, built in 1914 in the Irish Romanesque style by Rudolph M. Butler is so imposing that it is usually referred to as ‘Newport Cathedral’.

It has a magnificent stained glass east window of The Last Judgement, the last window completed by Harry Clarke in 1930.

The Black Oak River flows through the centre of the town and there are pleasant walking paths along its grassy banks through the Seven Arches Bridge as seen in my photographs.

The Moon

New moon on an early March night in Newport, Co. Mayo.  It was a very calm, clear and beautiful night as you can see the movement in the stars!

Old Boat

Chipped paint on an old weather beaten boat in Newport, Co. Mayo